Home » Blog » A visible transformation

A visible transformation

Here's Sister Regina in one of those first photos I took of her. In this photo taken three days after she entered the postulancy in September 2001, Regina is working on a craft project under the instruction of Sister Rose Michele Boudreau (RIP).

Here’s Sister Regina in one of those first photos I took of her. In this photo taken three days after she entered the postulancy in September 2001, Regina is working on a craft project under the instruction of Sister Rose Michele Boudreau (RIP).

I remember the first time I met Sister Regina Gallo. She had just entered the Sisters of Providence as a postulant. As a communications staff member, I was assigned to take some photos. I remember being excited that she was young (29). I noticed she was boisterous and fun.

But there was something I couldn’t quite put my finger on that seemed to be missing.

Working in communications for the Sisters of Providence in various roles over the past 15 years, I can say that one of my favorite parts of the job is interviewing the sisters and telling their stories. I always leave the interview inspired or intrigued, excited or with a new understanding. At the very least there is something to think about.

Recently I had the opportunity to interview Sister Regina for a video interview, some 13 years after I first met her. (Watch it here. Sister Regina talks about giving up her dream of marriage and family, about living the vows and more.)

As we went through the interview, I was inspired and intrigued. I was excited to share what she had to say with others. And during that interview, something struck me. Nothing was missing. I was very much talking to a Sister of Providence. (I’ve done it awhile and I have a feel for it.) This time, listening to Sister Regina, nothing was missing.

Sister Regina during our video interview this year. Watch the videos here.

Sister Regina during our video interview this year. Watch the videos here.

In the 13 years since I first met Sister Regina Gallo, she had truly become a Sister of Providence.

It was all there. The depth, the community spirit. A level of wisdom, a level of spiritual groundedness.

And I left excited. Excited because I realized that “becoming a sister” isn’t just something that happened in the 1960s when big groups of women entered the Congregation. It is something that is still happening today.

It left me excited about the future. Congregation numbers may be smaller, but that spiritual depth is still being passed on. It will still be here for generations to come.

The interview also left me thankful. Thankful to the women of today still willing to give their lives to this community, to serving and sharing love, mercy and justice with the world. And thankful for the women who are Sisters of Providence today, still passing on that wonderful wisdom and lived spirituality to the next generation.

Can you help us spread the word about the life as a Sisters of Providence to women of today? Do you know someone who might find fulfillment as a Sister of Providence? Tell her about the Sisters of Providence! Share Sister Regina’s videos with her. Or point her in the direction of our website: www.SistersofProvidence.org

Share this:

Amy Miranda

Amy Miranda is a Providence Associate of the Sisters of Providence and a staff member in their Mission Advancement office. Amy is a 1998 graduate of Saint Mary-of-the-Woods College. She currently manages the SP publication HOPE and works on marketing support for Providence Associates, new membership and Saint Mother Theodore Guerin.

Subscribe to the blog

Sign up to receive notifications in your inbox when new content is posted on the Sisters of Providence blog. Emails will only be sent when there is new content.

Become a Sister of Providence

Love, mercy, justice and you! Find your calling with the Sisters of Providence.

Explore your call

Hard times?

You are not alone. The Sisters of Providence will light a candle and pray for you and your loved ones through these difficult periods.

Get started

4 Comments

  1. Tracey Horan on December 21, 2014 at 8:50 am

    Love these photos and reflections, Amy! I would agree about Regina’s spirituality AND spunk. 🙂

  2. Marsha Speth, SP on December 21, 2014 at 10:37 am

    Having known S. Regina from her entrance until now, I certainly agree with you, Amy. Thank you for noticing and affirming what you see. This kind of growth happens slowly and is often hard to perceive in oneself especially. So thank you for the encouragement you give us all.

  3. Paula Damiano, SP on December 21, 2014 at 4:12 pm

    Such a great blog! Thank you Amy, for reflecting through Regina’s life what it means to be an SP.

  4. Carol Nolan on December 21, 2014 at 4:21 pm

    Thank you, Amy, and thank you, Regina! I remember when you came. I was a little worried about you, because you were the youngest in your group. But you turned out to be the star! I have always seen you as very close to your family, and deeply touched by the losses in your family. And you are faithful through thick and thin. You are so solid, Regina! We are blessed.

Leave a Comment





This site uses Akismet to reduce spam. Learn how your comment data is processed.