Home » Gospel Reflections » March 25, 2018: Palm Sunday of the Lord’s Passion

Gospel reflection

March 25, 2018: Palm Sunday of the Lord’s Passion

Reading: Philippians 2:6-11

Christ Jesus, though he was in the form of God,
did not regard equality with God
something to be grasped.

Rather, he emptied himself,
taking the form of a slave,
coming in human likeness;
and found human in appearance,
he humbled himself,
becoming obedient to the point of death,
even death on a cross.

Because of this, God greatly exalted him
and bestowed on him the name
which is above every name,
that at the name of Jesus
every knee should bend,
of those in heaven and on earth and under the earth,
and every tongue confess that
Jesus Christ is Lord,
to the glory of God the Father.

Reflection:

I chose to use this second reading for today’s reflection, rather than the Passion. To me, this reading is foundational to hearing the Passion read at Mass. As we listen to the Passion, we will find instances where “Jesus emptied himself” to reach out to others, where “Jesus humbled himself” to console those around him — all in the midst of his own suffering.

Action:

As you live this week of the Lord’s Passion, notice situations in which people have to “empty” or “humble” themselves for others. Perhaps it will be a mother with a baby in arms and two toddlers holding her hand or a cashier who has just dealt courteously with an irate customer. Offer a word of understanding or encouragement, even a smile to let them know you care.

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Sister Ann Casper

Sister Ann Casper, SP, is the executive director of the Mission Advancement office for the Sisters of Providence of Saint Mary-of-the-Woods, Indiana.

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1 Comment

  1. Mike Eck on March 23, 2018 at 12:00 am

    Beautiful reflection Sister Ann. Thank you.

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