Sister of Providence Mary Theodosia Mug, 1860-1943.

The following is a letter from Sister Mary Theodosia Mug to Mother Mary Cleophas Foley, mother superior from 1890 to 1926, about her cure. The letter was dated Nov. 21, 1908.

“Dear Mother,

“I am so happy, yet so abashed, as I begin to relate my cure. Why should I be favored above the many that have so fervently sought grace through the intercession of our revered and holy Foundress?

“Friday evening, October 30th, I went to visit the vault where repose the remains of Mother Theodore. It was no special devotion that took me there; I was only passing up from the crypt chapel and stopped to say my usual prayers there – the , three times , , and one ‘Glory to Mary forever,’ Mother Theodore’s oft-repeated exclamation in her diary. Then the thought came into my mind: ‘I wonder if she has any power with Almighty God.’ Instantly I heard in my soul the words, ‘Yes, she has.’ I was so startled by the suddenness and distinctness of the words – not any external voice or sound but an utterance to my soul – that I ran in haste from the spot and did not stop till I reached the head of the stairs near the sacristy. Then I paused and chided myself for my excitement – I am never afraid of the dead; why should I fear now? Again the words came to me, ‘Yes, she has,’ – but now only as a memory, not words as before. Then I said to myself, ‘Well, if she has, I wish she would show it,’ and I went about my work determined to think no more about it. However, the words came back to my memory at intervals, but as my mind was greatly occupied that night with work for the printers, composition and proofreading, they passed out of my thoughts very quickly, making no further impression.

“In the morning when I arose, I felt strong and rested, although I had been in bed for three hours. Without adverting to the fact for some moments, I found myself spreading my coverlets with both arms; hitherto I could employ only the right arm, and it was always quite an effort to get my bed made. My bad arm was now free and strong again. Then for the first time since February 3d, 1907, I rolled up my hair without resting my head on my knees. With suppleness, strength had returned, the fingers being as strong and quick on the piano, typewriter, etc., as if I had kept in daily practice. As I began to dress, I found the bands of my clothing had to be lapped over about two inches. The enlargement below the waist had disappeared, and the weight that prevented me from genuflecting, except with distress and pain, was no longer experienced. What became of the lump I do not know, but I feel nothing abnormal since that day. Moreover, I see now as I never saw before, and the exactions of setting and reading type seem never to cause a moment’s fatigue to the eyes.

“But what seems to me the most marvelous change is my perfect digestive power. I can eat anything that comes to the table and in such quantities as to amuse everyone. When we recall that I have been the worst kind of a dyspeptic nearly all my life, dieting always, and for long periods able to take no solid food whatever, and suffering greatly from such conditions, it seems wonderful. Blessed be God in His saints! To Mother Theodore I owe all this.

“Dear Mother, I beg you to thank God for His goodness to me and to add what you see and know of my cure, to the praise and glory of our holy Foundress – dear Mother Theodore.

“Your grateful and happy, Sister M. Theodosia”

De Profundis Gloria Patri Memorare

De Profundis is the Latin for the first words of Psalm 130: “Out of the depths I cry to you, O Lord … ” This psalm is traditionally prayed by Sisters of Providence for nine days after a sister dies.
Gloria Patri means “Glory to the Father” in Latin. These are the first words of a prayer used in many Christian churches. It is sometimes referred to as the doxology. The whole prayer is “Glory be to the Father and to the Son and to the Holy Spirit, as it was in the beginning, is now and ever shall be, world without end. Amen.”
Memorare is another Latin reference. It is the beginning word of a prayer to the Blessed Virgin Mary — “Remember O most gracious virgin Mary … ”